Psychology & Society
Psychology & Society


Current Issue - February 2015

This special issue of Psychology & Society was edited by guest editor Maria Cecilia Dedios-Sanguineti from the London School of Economics and Political Science. The focus of the issue is around the question of 'context' in a cultural psychology of human cognition, development and behaviour. In particular, the issue addresses the question of whether it is possible to put the context alongside culture when doing cultural psychology? Why is this necessary? Each of the contributors to this special issue propose different answers to these questions. Joshua Bruce examines how cultural psychology incorporates power into its theorizing and explanatory capabilities; Kurtis and Adams investigate culture and gender influences on interdependence; Goyal, Wice, Adams, Chauhan and Miller explore attributions of spousal transgressions in India and the US, challenging simple links between power, rights and responsibilities; Soerens views intimate partner violence among migrant women through the lens of the dialogical self; finally, Mandviwala provides a window into the experiences of adolescent Muslim girls growing up in America. Each of these efforts represents a nuanced and subtle approach to the study of the entanglements between culture, context, and mind.



Interwoven explorations: Culture and mind (in context): Introduction to the special issue
Maria Cecilia Dedios-Sanguineti

Cultural psychologists have produced a large body of evidence documenting the profound ways in which human cognition, development and behavior are shaped by culture. Is it possible to put the context at the center of the analysis along with a rigorous cultural inquiry when doing cultural psychology? Why would this be necessary? Each of the contributor to this special issue propose different answers to these questions. In doing so, they contribute to producing more nuanced and useful approaches to the study of the entanglements between culture, context, and mind.

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Power, Economic Inequality, and Moral Psychology
JOSHUA R. BRUCE

This paper demonstrates how cultural psychology incorporates power into its theorizing and explanatory capabilities. It begins by outlining a unified model of moral psychology based on Shweder’s “Big Three” Ethics, Moral Foundations Theory, and Cultural Theory. It then examines three types of power—relational, discursive, performative—which can be incorporated into cultural psychological work to offer a more nuanced analysis of social phenomena.

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Interdependence and Relationality Across Dimensions of Culture And Gender
TUĞÇE KURTİŞ and GLENN ADAMS

We induced an experience of interdependence among university students in the U.S. and Ghana, and examined consequences for measures of self-disclosure and relationship satisfaction. Results associated interdependence with lower emphasis on emotional intimacy and self-disclosure. The implication is that growth-oriented tendencies of emotional intimacy and self-disclosure are not a manifestation of (women’s) interdependence, but instead reflect engagement with sociocultural affordances for independence and affective individualism.

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Gender, Culture and Power: Investigating Spousal Transgressions in India and the United States
NAMRATA GOYAL, MATHEW WICE, MARIAN ADAMS, VANDANA CHAUHAN & JOAN G. MILLER

Research suggests an imbalance of duties exists between spouses in cultures in which hierarchical family relationships prevail (Neff, 2001; Turiel, 1998). Within these relationships, the male superiors are often seen to have more rights and the female subordinates more duties. We conducted a cross-cultural investigation within India and the United States (N=80) examining perceived transgressions between husbands and wives.

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Violence in the Borderlands: A Dialogical Approach to Intimate Partner Violence among Migrant Women
MARIA-JOSE SOERENS

In this article I explore the Dialogical Self (Hermans, 2012) as a framework to study the experience of undocumented victims of intimate partner violence (IPV). I argue that the concepts of multiplicity of selves, collective voices, and I-positioning in physical and imaginal spaces can be used to account for the fluidity and complexity of undocumented women’s self as transnational migrants, embedded in gender narratives, articulated in a physical and imaginal transnational space fraught with power dynamics.

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Using interviews from two case studies, this paper explores the bifurcated experiences of second-generation Muslim American adolescent girls in formative education settings, particularly middle and high school, in a post-9/11 America.

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